Are you in Good Hands?
or
Call 866-501-4511
Are you in Good Hands?
or

Article

Believe it or not, one of most germ-ridden places in your home isn’t the bathroom. It’s the kitchen. From counter to stovetop, a whole world of germs lurk unseen in multiple hot spots, and they can make you and your family seriously sick.

This pop-out infographic will show you the ickiest spots:

So how do you disinfect those gnarly places?

Sponge Disinfect your sponge every time you use it to clean up spills, especially if uncooked meat, poultry, seafood or vegetables were involved. To kill almost all the bacteria on a nonabrasive, cellulose sponge, you can put it in the microwave while it’s damp and heat it on high for two minutes. Just let it cool before removing it so you don’t burn your hands!

Kitchen sink drain Scrub the sink’s drain area with a combination of detergent and disinfectant. Then use an old toothbrush to banish dirt and germs from around the rim of the drain. Afterward, wipe it dry with a clean paper towel. Once a week, pour one teaspoon of bleach mixed with one quart of water down the drain itself.

Blender gasket Disassemble it, then wash it with hot water and dish soap, or stick it in the dishwasher. Just watch out for those sharp blades!

Refrigerator vegetable and meat compartments On a monthly basis, remove the drawers from the fridge and use a clean sponge to thoroughly wash them with a mild detergent like dish soap and warm water. Rinse the drawers with tap water until the soap residue is entirely gone, and then dry them with a clean towel before putting them back in the fridge.

Faucet handle Prevent the threatening buildup of bacteria by wiping the handle with disinfectant every evening.

Kitchen floor Wipe up spills with a paper towel and a disinfectant cleanser immediately. On a weekly basis, sweep or vacuum the floor, then mop it with warm water and a disinfectant cleanser, paying special attention to the areas in front of the sink, the stove and the fridge.

Tip

Did you know your car’s steering wheel has more bacteria, on average, than a toilet seat?